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News

CPN Blogs: 2013 World Press Photo Awards Days

Welcome to CPN’s coverage of the 2013 World Press Photo Awards Days.
CPN is blogging live from Amsterdam with all of the news, pictures and interviews from the event that celebrates the world’s best photography and multimedia.

Apr28

A grand occasion

By Steve Fairclough, Sunday April 28, 2013

HRH Prince Constantijn of the Netherlands, royal patron of World Press Photo Foundation, pictured on-stage addressing the audience during the awards ceremony of the 2013 World Press Photo Contest at the Muziekgebouw aan ‘t IJ in Amsterdam on 27 April 2013 © Cécile Mella

The 2013 World Press Photo Awards Days came to a close last night with a glittering awards ceremony held at the Muziekgebouw aan ‘t IJ in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, that culminated in Swedish photographer Paul Hansen (Dagens Nyheter) receiving his award for…

The 2013 World Press Photo Awards Days came to a close last night with a glittering awards ceremony held at the Muziekgebouw aan ‘t IJ in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, that culminated in Swedish photographer Paul Hansen (Dagens Nyheter) receiving his award for World Press Photo of the Year 2012.

BBC TV journalist Allan Little hosted the evening’s proceedings and opened with an interview with World Press Photo Managing Director Michiel Munneke, who stated: “The competition is really very tough – work has to really stand out. We had about 100,000 pictures from about 6,000 photographers from 124 different countries, so that already says that you really need to be very good as a photographer.”

The first half of the awards ceremony saw a screening of excerpts from the winning entries in the third annual World Press Photo Multimedia Contest and Allan Little spoke on-stage to Keith W. Jenkins (Supervising Senior Producer for Multimedia at National Public Radio, USA), who chaired the multimedia jury, and Santiago Lyon (Vice President and Director of Photography at The Associated Press), who chaired the 2013 World Press Photo Contest jury. Lyon commented: “What you find when you talk to photographers is a level of determination and commitment to telling the world what is going on in its darker corners.”

The winning images from the 2013 World Press Photo Contest were then screened with a superb musical accompaniment by acclaimed harpist Lavinia Meijer, before a short break in proceedings.

The second part of the ceremony began with all of the attending winners in the 2013 World Press Photo Contest coming on-stage, one-by-one, to receive their awards before Alan Little interviewed a small selection of prize winners, including multimedia winners Liz O. Baylen and Arkasha Stevenson, Italian freelance photographer Paolo Patrizi (second prize winner in the Daily Life Stories category) and Stefan Vanfleteren (Panos, winner of the Staged Portraits Stories category).

After a short musical interlude by Lavinia Meijer and Dutch singer/songwriter Theo Nijland, His Royal Highness Prince Constantijn of the Netherlands, royal patron of World Press Photo Foundation, then addressed the audience and noted: “Some of this year’s award-winning images are strong examples of work by photographers who have taken courageous positions that challenge the simplistic orthodoxy of the mainsteam.”

Mike Owen, European Professional imaging Communications Manager, Canon Europe, was then invited on-stage by Allan Little and delivered a speech in which he stated: “The World Press Photo competition is a major part of the annual photographic calendar and Canon is proud to sponsor this event. Some of these stories may not be easy viewing, but they are stories that need to be told; they are stories that have to be told and they are stories that want to be told. The commitment, dedication and skill of these photographers never ceases to impress us and we, at Canon, feel it is our duty to support the photographic community.”

The author of the World Press Photo of the Year 2012, Paul Hansen then received his award. As well as a cash prize of €10,000, Hansen was presented with a professional Canon EOS DSLR camera and lens kit by Canon Europe’s Mike Owen.

Paul Hansen then addressed the audience with a thoughtful speech which he concluded with the following words: “Photojournalism for me is about meeting people; it’s about building bridges, and not walls, to try to create an understanding between people. You might call me naive, but that’s what I believe. I believe that one of the most important tasks of journalism is to create an atmosphere where it becomes harder for those architects of evil to do their work. To deprive them of those building blocks and dismantle the walls before they are even built.”

Mike Owen, European Professional Imaging Communications Manager, Canon Europe, pictured whilst delivering his speech during the awards ceremony of the 2013 World Press Photo Contest held in the Muziekgebouw aan ‘t IJ in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on 27 April 2013. © Cécile Mella

The winner of the World Press Photo of the Year 2012 Paul Hansen (right) gives his speech at the climax of the awards ceremony of the 2013 World Press Photo Contest held in the Muziekgebouw aan ‘t IJ in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on 27 April 2013. © Cécile Mella

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Apr27

Paolo Pellegrin on critics and influences

By David Corfield, Saturday April 27, 2013

Paolo Pellegrin (Magnum Photos) pictured whilst talking to CPN outside the Felix Meritis centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on 27 April 2013 © Cécile Mella

Magnum Photos photographer, and Canon Ambassador, Paolo Pellegrin was in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, this week where he received his tenth World Press Photo award and delivered a presentation of his work to an audience at the Felix Meritis centre on the afternoon of 27 April 2013.

Asked about who influenced him as a photographer…

Magnum Photos photographer, and Canon Ambassador, Paolo Pellegrin was in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, this week where he received his tenth World Press Photo award and delivered a presentation of his work to an audience at the Felix Meritis centre on the afternoon of 27 April 2013.

Asked about who influenced him as a photographer, his thoughts on criticism and how his work has evolved and developed over the years, he revealed: “Black and white is how I was introduced to photography, through the work of photographers such as Josef Koudelka, Eugene Richards and Gilles Peress in particular.

“Peress is, for me, the father of contemporary documentary photography,” Paolo admitted. “I learned a lot from his work.”

Now one of the most respected photographers of his generation, Paolo Pellegrin is, nevertheless, no stranger to criticism. He explained: “I’ve had a few issues which have been widely reported; the Rochester, New York, USA image of a former US Marine Corps member with his rifle being the most talked about. I take criticism very seriously and I listen to everyone. I think it’s important that any work gets talked about, debated and criticised. We are here at World Press Photo, which is one of the finest examples of such a discussion process.”

Paolo revealed: “I take my job very seriously and hope that through my work I can influence and inspire other photographers to use their skills to report on the world and produce great images.”

The audience watches Paolo Pellegrin’s presentation during the World Press Photo Awards Days at the Felix Meritis centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on 27 April 2013. © Cécile Mella

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Apr27

Maria Mann on the photographer/agency relationship

By David Corfield, Saturday April 27, 2013

Maria Mann, Director of International Relations and Creative Photography at the European Pressphoto Agency (EPA), pictured outside the Felix Meritis centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on 27 April 2013. © Cécile Mella

The World Press Photo Awards Days are not only an opportunity for photographers and imaging industry professionals to examine and celebrate the power of great imagery, but they also provide a unique opportunity for agency heads and bureau chiefs to catch up and network with photographers as well as…

The World Press Photo Awards Days are not only an opportunity for photographers and imaging industry professionals to examine and celebrate the power of great imagery, but they also provide a unique opportunity for agency heads and bureau chiefs to catch up and network with photographers as well as each other.

Maria Mann, Director of International Relations and Creative Photography at the European Pressphoto Agency (EPA), revealed an important function that the World Press Photo Awards Days facilitate: spending quality time with photographers.

“It’s such a great opportunity to reconnect with our precious photographers,” she revealed. “The relationship we create and cultivate with them is crucial for success and the goodwill and dedication they show us by working – often beyond expectation – is a testament to how important that agency/photographer relationship is.”

She continued: “I’ve been coming to World Press Photo now for many years, originally as an agency photo editor and then a judge twice in later years, and it’s personally very gratifying to meet so many very good friends whose careers we have helped and who continue to work with us to this day. Smaller agencies have created something that was very necessary. In a wire service it is very difficult to afford that attention and fit together the people who work so well.”

Maria Mann added: “Even in an agency like ours, where we have 400 staffers, everyone knows everyone because they need to speak to you, and you need to speak to them, and every time you do it opens up another little box of knowledge.”

She revealed: “Awards are something we [EPA] never strive for; they are by-products. Being judged by World Press Photo for example, by people of such a high level, is incredibly important for a photographer, especially if they work in a very remote region where their only real voice is their work.”

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Apr27

Canon hosts dinner for winners

By Steve Fairclough, Saturday April 27, 2013

The invited guests walk around and view the World Press Photo exhibition during the Canon dinner in the Oude Kerk in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on 26 April 2013. © Cécile Mella

The Canon dinner for the winners in the 2013 World Press Photo Contest was held in the historic Oude Kerk church in Amsterdam on the evening of Friday 26 April 2013 and gave many of this year’s winning photographers and multimedia experts the first opportunity to see their stunning…

The Canon dinner for the winners in the 2013 World Press Photo Contest was held in the historic Oude Kerk church in Amsterdam on the evening of Friday 26 April 2013 and gave many of this year’s winning photographers and multimedia experts the first opportunity to see their stunning work exhibited.

After the guests had enjoyed their dinner, World Press Photo’s Managing Director Michiel Munneke addressed the audience and said: “Canon is our most loyal partner, that we’ve had for over 20 years now, and it is with great respect and gratefulness that we are able now to say that we signed [a sponsorship deal] for another three years. We are very pleased with this support we get from Canon.”

Munneke then announced the 12 photographers who have been selected, from 174 candidates from 54 countries, by an independent selection committee for the 2013 Joop Swart Masterclass. The Masterclass is a six-day event during which participating young photographers interact with six prominent experts to discuss technical and visuals aspects of their work as well as their role as photographers.

The committee chose 12 photographers – five men and seven women – to participate in the 2013 Joop Swart Masterclass. They are Evgenia Arbugaeva (Russia), Fatemah Behboudi (Iran), Arnau Blanch Vilageliu (Spain), Peter Dicampo (USA), Maika Elan (Vietnam), Edouard Elias (France), An-Sofie Kesteleyn (Belgium), Diana Markosian (Russia/USA), Ali Noureldine (Palestinian Territories), Dina Oganova (Georgia), Maria Turchenkova (Russia), and Veejay Villafranca (The Philippines). All of the selected photographers will have to prepare a project on the theme of ‘Hope’.

Following the Joop Swart Masterclass announcement Mike Owen, European Professional imaging Communications Manager, Canon Europe, delivered a speech and noted: “This year the events in the Middle East are continuing to dominate the overall awards but the awards do cover so much more than just pure photojournalism – it’s very important to remember this and I think that we all have a responsibility to ensure that this is communicated to the wider photographic community. Photography is a tool that is used to inform and educate every single day and most importantly it tells a story of the world in which we live – stories that otherwise many would not see. For that I congratulate each and every one of you for the work you do.”

As keepsakes of their success personalised versions of the World Press Photo Yearbook were produced for each attending 2013 World Press Photo Contest winner, featuring one of their images on the cover, and these were eagerly collected throughout the night. Many attendees also took the chance to go in front of the lens of photographer Joris van Egmond in a special Canon portrait studio in the choir area of the Oude Kerk, after which their photos were printed out on Canon PIXMA PRO-100 printers.

World Press Photo Managing Director Michiel Munneke (centre) pictured addressing the assembled guests at the Canon dinner in the Oude Kerk in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on 26 April 2013. © Cécile Mella

Mike Owen (right), European Professional imaging Communications Manager, Canon Europe, pictured delivering his speech to the audience of prize-winning photographers and invited guests from the professional photography industry during the Canon dinner in the Oude Kerk in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on 26 April 2013. © Cécile Mella

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Apr27

A clever career choice

By Steve Fairclough, Saturday April 27, 2013

Vietnamese photographer Maika Elan pictured in the Felix Meritis centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, during the 2013 World Press Photo Awards Days. © Cécile Mella

Back in 2010 Maika Elan swapped fashion photography to pursue a career as a documentary photographer and, just a few years later, her decision has paid off handsomely with first prize in the Contemporary Issues Stories category of the 2013 World Press Photo Contest for her story ‘The Pink Choice’, about…

Back in 2010 Maika Elan swapped fashion photography to pursue a career as a documentary photographer and, just a few years later, her decision has paid off handsomely with first prize in the Contemporary Issues Stories category of the 2013 World Press Photo Contest for her story ‘The Pink Choice’, about same-sex relationships in her home country of Vietnam.

Maika admits that photography was initially just a hobby but she then started to take photos in a more serious way whilst completing a degree in sociology. She told CPN: “When I worked in fashion I had to work with a lot of people; I always had to follow the styling and could not decide anything myself. When I started documentary photography I thought ‘Oh, I can do everything by myself’ and it was really something of my own. It was the first time I could talk more and meet the people I take photos of… so I quit fashion [photography].”

She found out about winning her World Press Photo award in an unconventional way: “I didn’t know what day they announced it. I checked my Facebook [account] and I saw that all of my friends had put ‘congratulations’. I didn’t know why so many people had put this, so I checked and then I knew that I’d got this prize. I was so surprised and very, very happy.”

Of attending her first ever World Press Photo Awards Days Maika said: “It’s great. It’s a chance for me to meet a lot of people and see a lot of beautiful work.” In addition to her award Maika got some extra good news during the Awards Days when it was revealed that she will be one of the 12 photographers who were chosen, from 174 candidates, to participate in the World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass during November this year.

Her award-winning project ‘The Pink Choice’ is now at an end, so what are her plans for the future? “I would like to tell different stories. I love to work with people, but I always try to work in my own country first.”

An image from Maika Elan’s project ‘The Pink Choice’. 22 June 2012, Da Nang, Vietnam. Phan Thi Thuy Vy and Dang Thi Bich Bay, who have been together for one year, watch television to relax after studying at school. Vietnam has historically been unwelcoming to same-sex relationships but its Communist government is considering recognising same-sex marriage, a move that would make it the first Asian country to do so. © Maika Elan/MoST

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Apr27

Pictures at an exhibition

By Steve Fairclough, Saturday April 27, 2013

Attendees, including Canon Ambassador Paolo Pellegrin (right), view some of the winning images from the 2013 World Press Photo Contest in the Oude Kerk in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, during the Canon dinner on the evening of 26 April 2013. The World Press Photo exhibition will be on display in the Oude Kerk until 23 June this year and will then go on tour to around 100 venues across the world. © Cécile Mella

 


Apr27

Studying the storm

By David Corfield, Saturday April 27, 2013

Photographer Daniel Berehulak (Getty Images) pictured in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, during the 2013 World Press Photo Awards Days. His coverage the after-effects of Japan’s 2011 tsunami disaster won 3rd prize in the General News Stories category of the 2013 World Press Photo Contest. © Cécile Mella

“It’s nice to have the luxury of time in my job,” explained Getty Images’ photographer Daniel Berehulak. “But it’s something that I get very little of. For this story, on the dramatic after-effects of Japan’s tsumani in 2011, I was playing catch-up and so decided to spend several weeks documenting…

“It’s nice to have the luxury of time in my job,” explained Getty Images’ photographer Daniel Berehulak. “But it’s something that I get very little of. For this story, on the dramatic after-effects of Japan’s tsumani in 2011, I was playing catch-up and so decided to spend several weeks documenting the despair many people still feel as they struggle to rebuild their lives.”

On his images of the devastation caused by the tsunami - in the story ‘Japan After the Wave’, which won 3rd prize in the General News Stories category - Daniel Berehulak explained: “I couldn’t do it justice in a couple of days, so spent several weeks in the area, embedding myself with the people and slowly building up a picture of how the tsunami ravaged the landscape and those living on it.”

Based in New Delhi, India, Berehulak is photographer for the Getty Images’ News Service and he mainly covers social and political issues in the South Asia region. A native of Sydney, Australia, he studied history at the University of New South Wales before deciding upon photography as his true calling.

He explained: “I joined Getty Images in 2002 in Sydney and relocated to London as a staff news photographer in 2005, covering the war in Iraq, the trial of Saddam Hussein and the after-effects of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster.”

Daniel is no stranger to World Press Photo success as his latest award is his third, having previously been successful in the 2008 and 2011 contests.

Pine trees, uprooted during the 2011 tsunami, lay strewn over the beach on 7 March 2012 in Rikuzentakata, Japan. © Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

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Apr26

Multimedia with a difference...

By David Corfield, Friday April 26, 2013

Musician Mike Stevens (left) and Larry Towell (right) perform on-stage during the Sem Presser Lecture in the Concertzaal of the Felix Meritis centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on 26 April 2013.© Cécile Mella

Magnum Photos photographer Larry Towell delivered the Sem Presser Lecture (in cooperation with Stichting Sem Presser Archief) to a packed Concertzaal at the Felix Meritis centre today, 26 April, in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Towell, who is also a poet and a musician as well as a farmer in Ontario…

Magnum Photos photographer Larry Towell delivered the Sem Presser Lecture (in cooperation with Stichting Sem Presser Archief) to a packed Concertzaal at the Felix Meritis centre today, 26 April, in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Towell, who is also a poet and a musician as well as a farmer in Ontario, Canada, shared the stage with fellow Canadian Mike Stevens, a harmonica virtuoso who has played on the stage of the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tennessee, USA more than 300 times. At times a musical concert, at times a powerful eyewitness account of many of the biggest world events of the last 40 years, and at times a hilarious self-parody, Towell delivered a multimedia experience with a difference. “It’s multimedia the old-fashioned way,” he remarked, while applying Rosin to a bow before striking up a hand saw…

His lecture was not exactly conventional, but what it lacked in format more than made up for in content, with images from conflict zones in El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Palestine, Lebanon, Vietnam and Afghanistan being accompanied by squeeze box, guitar, harmonica, singing and a whole lot of toe-tapping.

Towell is difficult to label, almost impossible, but his photographic skill is obvious, with a sharp sense of timing and careful composition being the running themes throughout the many black and white images on show.

He received warm applause from the audience and concluded up his Sem Presser Lecture by saying: “I’ve always been a songwriter, and I’ve composed many tunes while sitting in a hotel room processing films. This was an interactive multimedia show the old fashioned way.”

As the audience departed and Towell packed up his instruments, he carefully picked up his harmonicas and put them away – in an old Ilford Multigrade paper box…

Musician Mike Stevens (left) and Larry Towell (right) perform during the Sem Presser Lecture in the Concertzaal of the Felix Meritis centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on 26 April 2013. © Cécile Mella

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Apr26

A view from the cage

By Steve Fairclough, Friday April 26, 2013

Chinese photographer Xiaoqun Zheng (of Wengzhou Daily, pictured right of picture) and his interpreter watch the screen during his presentation ‘The Cage’ at the Felix Meritis centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on 26 April 2013. © Cécile Mella

The presentations by award-winning photographers in the 2013 World Press Photo Contest began this morning in the Felix Meritis centre in central Amsterdam and ‘The Cage’ – the black and white work of photographer Xiaoqun Zheng showing animals behind bars in Chinese zoos – quickly caught the attention…

The presentations by award-winning photographers in the 2013 World Press Photo Contest began this morning in the Felix Meritis centre in central Amsterdam and ‘The Cage’ – the black and white work of photographer Xiaoqun Zheng showing animals behind bars in Chinese zoos – quickly caught the attention of the audience in the venue.

‘The Cage’ won second place in the Nature Stories category of the contest and Xiaoqun Zheng, who has been a photographer at Wengzhou Daily since 1994, told the audience: “I took this series of photos in zoos in 10 different cities in China and they [the animals] are very lonely, sad and helpless. It [the project] was a coincidence – I went to the zoo for another project and I suddenly realised that the animals were very lonely; that’s why I tried to focus my lens on them.”

Another ‘stand-out’ presentation from this morning’s session was ‘Bitter Sugar, a Mystery Disease’ – a multimedia piece by Peruvian photojournalist Esteban Félix (The Associated Press). This told the story of sugar cane workers in remote areas of Nicaragua who have no other choice of job and often contract severe kidney failure due to working with chemicals over a period of years. When the presentation ended it received a prolonged and heartfelt round of applause from the audience in the Concertzaal of the Felix Meritis centre.

Chinese photographer Xiaoqun Zheng pictured whilst delivering his presentation ‘The Cage’ at the Felix Meritis centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on 26 April 2013. © Cécile Mella

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Apr26

Ilnitsky on the art of black & white

By David Corfield, Friday April 26, 2013

Russian photographer Sergei Ilnitsky from the European Pressphoto Agency (EPA) is in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, this week to experience the World Press Photo Awards Days for the first time. © Cécile Mella

Sergei Ilnitsky, has been a staff photographer for the European Pressphoto Agency (EPA) in Moscow, Russia, since 2003 and is in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, this week to celebrate his first World Press Photo Contest success: 2nd prize award in the Sports Action Stories category of the…

Sergei Ilnitsky, has been a staff photographer for the European Pressphoto Agency (EPA) in Moscow, Russia, since 2003 and is in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, this week to celebrate his first World Press Photo Contest success: 2nd prize award in the Sports Action Stories category of the prestigious awards.

“I am a staff photographer at EPA and I am told where to go and what to shoot, so I didn’t plan to photograph the fencing in the Olympics. It was just another assignment,” he explained.

“But I approached it with the simple aim to capture the artistic side of the sport. The dark background and the white costumes gave the pictures a really special quality and with the equipment I was using, a Canon EOS-1D X with an EF70-200mm f/2.8L USM lens, I was able to react really quickly to the action as it would happen so fast.”

“Shooting in black and white makes you think differently as a photographer. It’s really nice to be able to have an opportunity to work creatively and report the news in an interesting way. There’s something special about black and white which I love.”

The 38-year-old enjoys photographing sport, but considers it just one part of his daily life as a photographer. “I have photographed so many different things while at EPA – nomads, Siberian children’s colonies, industrial and political stories – but this was my first big sporting event and I really enjoyed it.”

Alaaeldin Abouelkassem of Egypt (top) in action against Peter Joppich of Germany during their Men's Foil Individual Round 16 match for the London 2012 Olympic Games in London, Britain, 31 July 2012. © Sergei Ilnitsky/EPA

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Apr26

Cameras, colour and cassowaries

By David Corfield, Friday April 26, 2013

Christian Ziegler is a wildlife photographer with a scientific background who uses his images to help to spread the message of conservation. © Cécile Mella

Christian Ziegler is a patient man. For three years he devoted himself to studying one of Australia’s rarest – and most intriguing – of birds: the southern cassowary.

“The only way to get close to these birds is to spend time with them, to get to know and understand their habits…

Christian Ziegler is a patient man. For three years he devoted himself to studying one of Australia’s rarest – and most intriguing – of birds: the southern cassowary.

“The only way to get close to these birds is to spend time with them, to get to know and understand their habits and movements,” Ziegler explained. All his efforts in getting to know this most elusive of birds has been rewarded, though, with first prize in the Nature Singles category of this year’s World Press Photo Contest. And it’s the cassowary, a flightless two-metre-high bird, which Ziegler wants to dedicate his award to.

“Cassowaries are an endangered species now, with around only 1,500 left in the wild,” he revealed, “so it’s really important that all efforts are made to protect and conserve them. They are really important to the rainforests of northern Queensland, because they carry large seeds in their stomachs over long distances and so help to maintain and enhance the forest ecosystem. Several tree species actually rely on these birds to help disperse their seeds.”

Ziegler liked his winning image particularly because the colours of the berries matched the colour of the bird’s head. He explained: “I used my Canon EOS 5D Mark II and an EF16-35mm f/2.8L II USM lens with a remote cable, because I didn’t want to get too close – they can be quite dangerous if frightened. I noticed the berries and knew immediately that they would be perfect and, fortunately, cassowaries are attracted to blue objects.”

Ziegler is fundamentally a biologist first and a photographer second, but is using his camera to help spread the word of conservation and demonstrate visually the fragility of our planet by focusing his efforts on rare and endangered species.

He revealed: “I am a tropical ecologist by training and for the last 10 years I have been working for the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama. It’s fantastic that my work has been recognised at this high level and I hope this gives my pictures – and more importantly my subjects – a bigger profile.”


The southern cassowary is an endangered species and native to northern Australian rain forests. Here in Christian Ziegler's winning image, one feeds on the fruit of the Blue Quandang tree. © Christian Ziegler

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Apr26

“Hijack the tools...”

By Steve Fairclough, Friday April 26, 2013

Keith W. Jenkins pictured during his presentation on mobile apps that help to enhance storytelling and showcase photography at the Felix Meritis centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on 25 April 2013. © Cécile Mella

“Hijack the tools” was the message from Keith W. Jenkins, chair of the 2013 World Press Photo Contest Multimedia jury, who was back in Amsterdam for the World Press Photo Awards Days to present on how utilising mobile apps can help to lift storytelling and present photography in a compelling way…

“Hijack the tools” was the message from Keith W. Jenkins, chair of the 2013 World Press Photo Contest Multimedia jury, who was back in Amsterdam for the World Press Photo Awards Days to present on how utilising mobile apps can help to lift storytelling and present photography in a compelling way.

Those apps discussed by Keith W. Jenkins were specially selected by a panel of multimedia experts including Jenkins (who is Supervising Senior Producer for National Public Radio in the USA), Claudine Boeglin (Multimedia Director, Thomson Reuters Foundation) and Antoinette Hoes (Head of Strategy, Tribal DDB Amsterdam) from a list of suggestions compiled by World Press Photo and its network of contacts.

Jenkins advised: “You need to have a digital identity – you need to think about what is your digital persona, how you present yourself, how you present your work, how you reach your audience as an individual or as member of an organisation.”

The apps were divided into four types – stories, publishing, location-based and tools – and Keith W. Jenkins highlighted the use of tools such as Instagram by publications such as The New Yorker and National Geographic to showcase photography and gain audience. Others useful apps highlighted included Photosynth, Vine, Tout, Vyclone (a location based app for multi-camera shoots at events), 7 Scenes, Google +, Layar, Storify, Tumblr and App Machine.

Jenkins wrapped up his presentation by advising: “I want to leave you with the idea of hijacking some of these tools to do your work in new and interesting ways to meet and greet new people into your universe as users and consumers of your great photojournalism.”

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Apr25

Campbell reveals multimedia research

By David Corfield, Thursday April 25, 2013

Dr. David Campbell presents his findings of his multimedia research to the audience at the World Press Awards Days, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, 25 April 2013. © Cécile Mella

The World Press Photo Awards Days’ multimedia presentations saw a full-house today, 25 April, as photojournalists, picture editors and filmmakers alike all gathered in the Concertzaal of the Felix Meritis centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, to hear the results of Dr. David Campbell’s study into the issues…

The World Press Photo Awards Days’ multimedia presentations saw a full-house today, 25 April, as photojournalists, picture editors and filmmakers alike all gathered in the Concertzaal of the Felix Meritis centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, to hear the results of Dr. David Campbell’s study into the issues surrounding the emergence and development of multimedia in visual storytelling.

“The digital revolution is a defining moment, a new media space, where visual storytelling needs to combine all its strengths into image-orientated reportage,” he told the audience. “In one Internet minute, nearly 640,000GB of global IP data is transferred and by 2015 the number of networked devices will be twice the world’s population.”

Campbell’s research was conducted under the auspices of the World Press Photo Academy, one of its objectives being to initiate and publish research into issues that concern the photographic community. This project – which took nine months to compile – is the first such initiative. Campbell later told CPN: “If the audience numbers were anything to go by, this was very popular and I’m delighted that so many industry professionals are taking notice of the changing digital landscape.”

He noted: “Multimedia always used to be something of a sidebar, but not any more. In 2017 there will be more mobile devices in the world than there will be people. Everybody is implicated in the digital ecosystem – we are now in the age of post-industrial journalism.”

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Apr25

Picking up the passes...

By Steve Fairclough, Thursday April 25, 2013

The great and the good from the worlds of photography and multimedia pick up their registration passes at the Felix Meritis centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, on 25 April 2013 before watching a wide range of multimedia presentations. © Cécile Mella

 


Apr25

Arkasha Stevenson on changing times

By David Corfield, Thursday April 25, 2013

Arkasha Stevenson, USA, presents her multimedia documentary ‘Living with a Secret’ to the audience at the Felix Meritis centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, 25 April 2013. © Cécile Mella

The World Press Photo Awards Days multimedia presentations began with photojournalist Arkasha Stevenson from the USA presenting her powerful multimedia documentary she produced for the Los Angeles Times to an audience at the Felix Meritis centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Entitled ‘Living with a Secret’…

The World Press Photo Awards Days multimedia presentations began with photojournalist Arkasha Stevenson from the USA presenting her powerful multimedia documentary she produced for the Los Angeles Times to an audience at the Felix Meritis centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Entitled ‘Living with a Secret’, her documentary won 2nd prize in the Online Short category and dealt with the highly sensitive transgender issues faced by a 12-year old girl called Amber, originally born a boy.

“An increasing number of children in the US are questioning their gender identity and seeking professional support at transgender clinics,” Stevenson told the audience. “Because of their age, the complex and emotional journey is as much their parents' as their own.”

“I’ve never worked on a story before that so many people wanted to share an opinion on,” she admitted. “This isn’t a story about science and medicine, it’s a story about personal identity.”

With executive production by Marc Martin, Stevenson’s documentary was created on a Canon EOS 5D Mark III DSLR and filmed, edited and produced in just two days for the newspaper, where she worked as a photography and video intern.

Stevenson is now embarking on a summer internship, this time with MediaStorm, an interactive design and video production studio based in New York, USA, that works with top visual storytellers, interactive designers and global organizations where she will further broaden her experiences as a photographer and filmmaker, buoyed no doubt by her World Press Photo success.

A still from Arkasha Stevenson's multimedia documentary produced for the Los Angeles Times, USA. © Arkasha Stevenson/Los Angeles Times

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Apr25

Hansen on the power of photojournalism

By David Corfield, Thursday April 25, 2013

Winner of the World Press Photo of the Year 2012, Sweden's Paul Hansen, pictured at the World Press Photo headquarters in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. © Cécile Mella

Sweden’s Paul Hansen, winner of the World Press Photo of the Year 2012, remains humbled by the recognition his image has received and frustrated by the continuing war in Gaza, scene of his acclaimed photograph. To him, no amount of awards and praise can replace the lives of children.

“This image has affected me so deeply that…

Sweden’s Paul Hansen, winner of the World Press Photo of the Year 2012, remains humbled by the recognition his image has received and frustrated by the continuing war in Gaza, scene of his acclaimed photograph. To him, no amount of awards and praise can replace the lives of children.

“This image has affected me so deeply that I am still in shock by what I saw,” he said. “It’s not like I can get away from this picture, and it’s not that I want to either. I have since been back to Gaza City and met the mother of the two sons who were killed in that picture, and she was actually grateful: grateful that in some small way they live on in the minds of the world.”

“But while I was there, a missile from a drone hit a playing field near where I was based. A piece of shrapnel hit a little girl in the head and killed her. So you see, the tragedy is all around – it never goes away. And I felt terrible that the world will never know about her…”

Hansen is currently working on a series of personal projects in his native Sweden and remains on staff at Dagens Nyheter, the newspaper where he has worked for the last 13 years. He explained: “The power of photography and its ability to make change is what drives me to do better work. Thanks to World Press Photo for understanding my mission.”

Gaza Burial, Gaza City, Palestinian Territories, 20 November 2012. The World Press Photo of the Year 2012, taken by Sweden's Paul Hansen. © Paul Hansen/Dagens Nyheter

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Apr25

Anticipation, expectation, preparation…

By David Corfield, Thursday April 25, 2013

The Felix Meritis building, located at Keizersgracht 324 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, is home to the World Press Photo Awards Days, which run from 25-27 April. © Cécile Mella

Over the course of the next three days, World Press Photo will showcase to the world the very best that photojournalism and photography has to offer and the CPN blogging team will be live on the ground reporting from the Felix Meritis building in Amsterdam with all the latest news from the World Press Photo Awards Days…

Over the course of the next three days, World Press Photo will showcase to the world the very best that photojournalism and photography has to offer and the CPN blogging team will be live on the ground reporting from the Felix Meritis building in Amsterdam with all the latest news from the World Press Photo Awards Days.

As preparations for The Netherlands’ annual Queen’s Day continue – with Queen Beatrix abdicating on 30 April, to be succeeded by her son, the soon-to-be King Willem-Alexander – the winning multimedia teams and photographers in the 56th annual World Press Photo Contest are putting their own finishing touches to presentations and exhibitions for the 2013 World Press Photo Awards Days.

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World Press Photo

Calendar - April 2013

  • Thursday - 25 April
  • Friday - 26 April
  • Saturday - 27 April
  • Sunday - 28 April

CPN Team

  • Steve Fairclough

    CPN Editor-in-Chief
  • David Corfield

    CPN Editor
  • Cécile Mella

    Photographer

    © David Graham