Selecteer uw taal
  • Deutsch

    Sämtliche Inhalte auf der CPN-Website sind auf Englisch verfügbar. Einige Inhalte, wie z. B. Produktbeschreibungen, aktuelle Produkteinführungen und einige technische Artikel, sind ebenfalls auf Deutsch, Spanisch, Französisch, Italienisch und Niederländisch erhältlich. Wählen Sie in der Liste oben Ihre Sprache aus, damit sämtliche darin verfügbaren Inhalte automatisch entsprechend Ihrer Wahl dargestellt werden. Ansonsten wird als Standardsprache Englisch verwendet.

  • English

    All content published on the CPN website is available in English. Some content – such as product descriptions, recent product launches and some technical articles – is also available in German, Spanish, French, Italian and Dutch. Choose your language from the list above and all content that is available in your language will automatically be displayed in your language, otherwise the default language will be English.

  • Español

    Todo el contenido publicado en la página web de CPN está disponible en inglés. Parte del contenido –como descripciones de producto, lanzamientos recientes de productos y algunos artículos técnicos– también están disponibles en alemán, español, francés, italiano e holandés. Elija su idioma en la lista anterior y todo el contenido que esté disponible en su idioma aparecerá automáticamente en ese idioma, o , si no, en el idioma predeterminado que es el inglés.

  • Français

    Tout le contenu publié sur le site Web de CPN existe en anglais. Une partie du contenu (comme les descriptions de produit, les lancements récents de produit et certains articles techniques) est également publié en allemand, en espagnol, en français, en italien et en néerlandais. Choisissez la langue dans la liste ci-dessus, et tout le contenu offert dans votre langue s’affiche automatiquement ; par défaut, le reste s’affiche en anglais.

  • Italiano

    Tutti i contenuti pubblicati sul sito CPN sono disponibili in inglese. Alcuni contenuti come descrizioni di prodotto, lanci di prodotti recenti e alcuni articoli tecnici sono disponibili anche in tedesco, spagnolo, francese, italiano e olandese. Seleziona la lingua dall'elenco in alto e automaticamente si visualizzeranno tutti i contenuti disponibili in quella lingua; diversamente la lingua di default sarà l’inglese.

  • Nederlands

    Alle inhoud die op de CPN-website wordt gepubliceerd, is beschikbaar in het Engels. Bepaalde inhoud, zoals productbeschrijvingen, onlangs gelanceerde producten en sommige technische artikelen, zijn ook beschikbaar in het Duits, Spaans, Frans, Italiaans en Nederlands. Kies de taal uit bovenstaande lijst, waarna alle inhoud die beschikbaar is in de gewenste taal, automatisch in die taal wordt weergegeven. Anders is Engels de standaardtaal.

Ambassadors Programme

Niet beschikbaar in
Explorer

Clive Booth

mei12

Documenting life on the Isle of Islay: Part Three

By Clive Booth, dinsdag mei 12, 2015
Creel fishermen John Baker (left) and Alec Campbell (right). Alec sold his own boat and retired from full-time fishing in 2012 and crews for John through the winter months. Taken on a Canon EOS-1D X with an EF16-35mm f/2.8L II IS USM lens at 35mm; the exposure was 1/800sec at f/4.5, ISO 160.

Creel fishermen John Baker (left) and Alec Campbell (right). Alec sold his own boat and retired from full-time fishing in 2012 and crews for John through the winter months. Taken on a Canon EOS-1D X with an EF16-35mm f/2.8L II IS USM lens at 35mm; the exposure was 1/800sec at f/4.5, ISO 160. © Clive Booth

Whilst sailing off the south-east coast of the Inner Hebridean island of Islay and looking across the calm waters to the Kintyre Peninsula on mainland Scotland, it’s easy to understand why John Baker always wanted to be a fisherman.

John’s career began 40 years ago when, at the age of 16, he joined his father Robert's boat. “Back then the little harbour in Port Ellen was home to over a dozen scallop and creel boats. The sea was plentiful and a fisherman could work five days a week and easily provide for his family. Fuel prices were low and profit margins high, and the social side of the industry was good. Fishing was an integral part of the community.”

For much of the year John fishes alone from his boat "The Harvester". The flat deck holds fleets of creels (baited, heavy steel framed nylon woven pots with a single funnel-shaped entrance to catch crab and lobster). Attached to a weighted line, the creels shoot at intervals from the stern of the boat, to lie on the seabed in a set. A marker buoy is attached to the end of the line to both help with location and retrieval. The creels are usually left overnight before being hooked and hauled in by winch, then emptied, stacked, rebated and the whole process repeated. Great care is taken when stacking the newly baited creels and the order in which they are put back into the water is vital. Many fishermen have lost their lives by being caught in the rope and pulled overboard.

Fishing is heavily regulated by the government and both fisherman and buyer must be licensed. The same, however, can’t be said for pricing; Buyers dictate the price depending on seasonal demand which is non-negotiable. Surprisingly John and many of the local fishermen sell their catches to Spain.

Today the harbour is host to a handful of boats and creel fishing is under threat of disappearing altogether. Stocks are depleted, fuel prices are crippling, margins are low and the high cost of maintaining a boat means that fisherman like John, even when working six days per week, can no longer support their families by fishing alone. “When I started to fish, the investment in a boat and equipment was worth making, but today - unless you already own your own boat - it’s simply not worth the outlay,” he says. Many Islanders have left the industry, selling their boats, retiring or taking up new careers. John Baker will not be one of them and at 58 he intends to fish until he retires. Sadly, the opportunities that John had, of fishing the once abundant waters of Islay, are no longer viable for today’s young Islanders.

The decline of the fishing industry is just one of many factors making it an ever greater challenge for younger generations to stay on the island, and live as their parents, grandparents and generations of islanders did before them.

Looking across a calm sea to the Kintyre Peninsula, Scotland, as seen from the south-east coast of Islay from John Bakers boat ‘The Harvester’. Taken on a Canon EOS-1D X with an EF24-70mm f/4L IS USM lens at 65mm; the exposure was 1/2000sec at f/4.0, ISO 160.

Looking across a calm sea to the Kintyre Peninsula, Scotland, as seen from the south-east coast of Islay from John Bakers boat ‘The Harvester’. Taken on a Canon EOS-1D X with an EF24-70mm f/4L IS USM lens at 65mm; the exposure was 1/2000sec at f/4.0, ISO 160.
© Clive Booth

John Baker hauls in an empty creel - an all-too-common occurrence, especially in the cold waters early in the year. Taken on a Canon PowerShot G7 X in a waterproof case attached to a Rode audio boom arm with a Manfrotto quick release tilt head, controlled remotely via WiFi from an iPhone 6; the exposure was 1/1250sec at f/2.8, ISO 125.

John Baker hauls in an empty creel - an all-too-common occurrence, especially in the cold waters early in the year. Taken on a Canon PowerShot G7 X in a waterproof case attached to a Rode audio boom arm with a Manfrotto quick release tilt head, controlled remotely via WiFi from an iPhone 6; the exposure was 1/1250sec at f/2.8, ISO 125. © Clive Booth